Tram lines now and then

This is public transport cartography based on data taken from Rail Map Online. The maps show ‘now’ and ‘then’ tram line networks in UK and Ireland cities. Read on this in The Guardian: In praise of the tram: Britain’s lost network and the future of transport . The following maps are copies taken from the same article.

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Heating repair

You can find out more here about our new ethnographic research project on the work of HVAC* technicians. The project is attached to the Institute of Geography and Sustainability, University of Lausanne and funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation. In collaboration with Alain Bovet and Moritz F. Fürst. Started 1.10.2017. Duration 3 years. Read more

pierre-de-plan-07

Image via www.lausanne.ch

*HVAC – heating, ventilation and air-conditioning

 

 

 

 

Subway crisis in the making

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Increasing passenger volumes + reduced investment and maintenance = declining performance. This equation and what it means for riders on NY subway in a NYT article really worth reading.

 

Five myths about infrastructure

To know what infrastructure we need to build, we need to have an idea of what kind of world we want to live in.

Joel H. Moser’s (*) discussion of Trump’s ‘Infrastructure Week’ and misconseptions on what IF is and does for society that are commonly present in politics and public debates today. This five infrastructural myths are discussed in his Washington Post article:

1. New infrastructure projects would reduce unemployment.
2. Regulations kill infrastructure projects.
3. Private investment leads to infrastructure projects.
4. Infrastructure spending will spur growth.
5. We know what infrastructure we need.

(*) “Joel H. Moser is  the founder and CEO of Aquamarine Investment Partners, an Adjunct Professor at Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.” (see article)