Andrés Jaque on ‘Outing Mies van der Rohe’s Basement’

I appreciated this essay about The Barcelona Pavilion, known as an iconic building of modern architecture. The art installation ‘PHANTOM. Mies as Rendered Society’ displayed objects and working tools from the pavilion’s basement. The essay discusses this intervention as a way … Continue reading

I appreciated this essay about The Barcelona Pavilion, which is an iconic building of modern architecture. The art installation ‘PHANTOM. Mies as Rendered Society‘ displayed objects and working tools from the pavilion’s basement. The essay discusses this intervention as a way of enhancing architectural knowledge through mundane things.

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Image via E-book: Phantom. Mies as Rendered Society (research and drawings: Office forPolitical Innovation. Graphic design: David Lorente and Tomoko Sakamoto) 

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Image via E-bookPhantom. Mies as Rendered Society (photo: Andrés Jaque, 2012) 

Andrés Jaque’s text is about The Barcelona Pavilion, built in 1986 by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Lilly Reich as a copy of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s ‘Repräsentationspavillon des Deutschen Reiches’ for the 1929 Barcelona International Exhibition. It is published as a chapter of Inventing the Social (edited by Noortje Marres, Michael Guggenheim and Alex Wilkie and published by Mattering Press). The book title is the program for the chapter. Jaque is in search of understanding how the pavillon brings innovatively people together, to know Mies and its architecture in new ways.

The pavilion is one of many associates of what he calls the Mies-knowing society. Mies-knowers or Mies-knowing-society members, for Jaque, are enthusiasts and fans of Mies van der Rohe in constant conversation with his architecture.

The chapter has an original focus, it is about the role and the functional importance of its basement and how this space underneath the building became an associate of the Mies-knowing society. The basement is in similar terms an associate of the pavilion, a little similar like the pavilion to the knowing society. However, ignored, unknown to and hidden from the society, its relationsship with the society is more complex than the rest of the building.

In the first part of the chapter we read about:

  • how the pavilion participates in the making of the ‘Mies-knowing society’;
  • the role of the basement in supporting the functioning of the pavilion;
  • the ways the basement and its supporting role is hidden from the public and how the invisibility of the basement is a constitutive feature of the pavilion and its replica condition;
  • how users of the pavilion spot differences between the original and the copy of the pavilion; and
  • how people use the pavilion, who do not belong to the Mies-knowing society.

In the second part of the chapter, Jaque – himself the director of an architectural office – presents the intervention ‘PHANTOM. Mies as Rendered Society’. PHANTOM exhibited in the pavilion objects and practices that are usually hidden in the basement. The intervention changed the Mies-knowing society through:

  • the ways how various groups incorporated, criticized and ignored the intervention;
  • exhibiting staff members work and a potential focus of criticism of pavilion users; and
  • the Mies-knowing society becoming aware that its own knowledge on modern architectural issues was based on mundane, however, hidden practices (maintenance, storage etc.)

The intervention changed the appreciation of the pavilion. But it did not only have positive effects. With the public display of the basement, the work of cleaning and maintenance stuff became also visible for those who usually do not see it. However, the public did not appreciate work of maintenance staff as important, it was “assessed as known” and not as valuable Mies-knowledge.

Jaque Andrés, 2018, « Outing Mies’ Basement: Designs to Recompose the Barcelona Pavilion’s Societies », Inventing the Social,  N. Marres, M. Guggenheim et A. Wilkie eds., Manchester, Mattering Press, p.149-170.

Download the open source book here.

Repair is (always) more than restoring the original

Kulturen des Reparierens (transcript Verlag, 2018) is a new text collection edited by Stefan Krebs, Gabriele Schabacher and Heike Weber. It includes an article from The Urban Repair Project:

“Dann müssen wir es so lassen Reparatur ist (immer) mehr als die Wiederherstellung des Normalzustandes” (pp. 347-371)

The book is Open Access and you can download the entire book here.

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Lower Ninth Ward flooding

The flooding of the Lower Ninth Ward explained and performed on a map by climatologist Barry Keim from Louisiana State University on his Hurricane Katrina & Environmental Tour of Metropolitan New Orleans at the Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers (AAG) 2018. Many thanks to Barry for geographical insights and stories told of life and death in New Orleans now and then.

The clip was recorded at the Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Platform, located at the end of Caffin Avenue at the intersection with Florida Ave. The spot is worth visiting as it offers further information on the ecology of the Main Outfall Canal situated behind the Lower Ninth Ward.

For information on why the Katrina disaster was man made and not ‘natural’, see the grassroots website levee.org.

As an urban geographer and ethnographer, I could not resist to film some of the more performative aspects of the tour and the ways geographers talk about and listen to how cities are transformed over time. Using maps is of course just one geographical thing to do on a field trip. Other spatial practices and gestures of interest: pointing at landscape features, taking pictures, taking notes, searching for shadow, walking and talking, categorising spaces, moving and looking around, group behaviour (such as getting on and off the bus), personal (geographical) conversations (e.g. ‘where are you based’) and many more.

(Recorded on 11 April 2018. Video published courtesy of Barry Kim)

Building identity through maintenance work

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New publication:

Der Beitrag der Hausmeister zur ldentität von Gebäuden – Block Checks in der Großwohnsiedlung Red Road in Glasgow. Identifikationsräume: Potenzial und Qualität großer Wohnsiedlungen. M. Harnack and J. Stollmann. Berlin, 2017, Universitätsverlag der TU Berlin: 54-69.

Last stroll around Red Road

A true digital mess at the site of the former highrise estate Red Road, Glasgow. Whilst Google Maps provides for 2D and 3D views of the demolition site, Google Street View still features images of the tower blocks. It is virtually the last chance for a stroll around the estate. (Recorded on 4 September 2017)