Evacuate the city

Salman Rushdie recounts the event in his novel The Enchantress of Florence: The destruction of Fatehpur Sikri had begun. . . . Slowly, moment by moment, retreating at a man’s walking pace, the water was receding. [The emperor] sent for the city’s leading engineers but they were at a loss to explain the phenomenon. . . . Without the lake the citizens who could not afford Kashmiri ice would have nothing to drink, nothing to wash or cook with, and their children would soon die. . . . Without the lake the city was a parched and shriveled husk. The water continued to drain away. The death of the lake was the death of Sikri as well. Without water we are nothing. Even an emperor, denied water, would swiftly turn to dust. Water is the real monarch and we are all its slaves. “Evacuate the city,” the emperor Akbar commanded. (Rushdie 2008, 344–45)

Paragraph as found in Nikil Anand’s book ‘Hydraulic City: Water and the Infrastructures of Citizenship in Mumbai’ (Durham and London, 2017, p. x).

 

Subway crisis in the making

ridership_v_maintenance-720

Increasing passenger volumes + reduced investment and maintenance = declining performance. This equation and what it means for riders on NY subway in a NYT article really worth reading.

 

Door without draft of air

kannel-crop

Read this article on how Theophilus Van Kannel was awarded US Patent #387571 A for the revolving door (a “Storm-door structure”) and how some researchers have found out that people don’t like to use it. Via 99percentinvisible.org

There is a lot to read about the revolving door. However, I have found not much on what’s happening when people go through them. Further reading:

James Buzard on Perpetual Revolution

Reyner Banham on The Architecture of the Well-Tempered Environment (pp.73-75)

Study on revolving door usage

Demolition of Moscow flats

4000Following an official decision, some 4000 apartment blocks, the so called Krushchevka flats, will be demolished. Scattered all over the city, the buildings are home to around two million people. The Guardian covers the story in an article and a great photo essay.