A science of queueing

Queueing looked at through truly psychological lenses. The last paragraph of the article includes a sort of garfinkelian breaching experiment with queues:

Social psychologists Stanley Milgram’s “students visited places they expected to find queues […] and systematically cut in between the third and fourth person, saying: “Excuse me, I’d like to get in here.” If someone protested, they would leave; if not, they would leave after one minute. His students reported finding it extremely stressful, yet only about 10% of the time were they ejected from the line.”

Author: ignazstrebel.net

Ignaz Strebel is an urban geographer and senior scientist at the University of Lausanne. His research is on the social and material practices that make up and transform urban systems. Using ethnography and audio-visual projects, he currently researches building care work, energy infrastructure services and the transformation capacities of prefabricated buildings.

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